Assumptions Exercise - Training

We use lots of these but had some interesting feedback the other day from a trainer and I wonder if anyone has either encountered this AND/OR brought up a good substitute which we could use

It's the Assumptions exercise based around world leaders -Roosevelt/Hitler/Churchill.Mini profile or pen portraits are presented to the audience. Two of these,based on fact, are quite loaded with references to drink,drugs etc.You ask the group to match the profile to the three leaders.Most people ascribe one of the most negative two to Hitler when in fact Roosevelt/Churchill are the two .Here's the question/situation

Most audiences know who Churchill and Hitler were but with younger audiences -below 35 in fact -Roosevelt is unknown lol. A hidden assumption there! So does anybody have a Roosevelt substitute.

Answers

I had a similar experience recently, which I rapidly turned into a learning opportunity, when I used a hidden picture of 'The Laughing Cavalier' to encourage trainees to ask open and funnelling questions to identify what I was holding behind my back.

Nobody had ever heard of this famous painting so I quickly moved on and took this learning lesson to heart!

Chris W.

Hi,

I use a variation of Goldilocks and the Three Bears (Many of my delegates are in their late teens to early 20s) it's amazing how many assumptions we make about this story (The second bowl is mummy bear's or that baby bear is a boy) - there is a free version of this from Glasstap at the moment.

A great way to prove that to Assume is to make an ASS out of U + Me

Jo

Dominic Andrew's picture

-- QED Training qedworks.com

THANKS

 

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