Coaching Climate Demands Cultural Change

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Employers universally accept that coaching can deliver tangible benefits for both individuals and organisations but admit to having little confidence in management ability to deliver it.

Ninety-nine per cent of bosses believe in the benefits of coaching and 88% of them now expect their line managers to deliver it as part of their daily routine. Yet 17% have little faith in management abilities to roll it out.

The findings come on the back of a book launch by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

Making Coaching Work is written by David Clutterbuck and David Megginson, co-founders of the European Mentoring and Coaching Council.

According to the authors, a systematic approach is needed when coaching staff in order to achieve change. Clutterbuck and Megginson identify seven stages of coaching:

  • Identify the need
  • Gather the evidence
  • Motivate and set targets
  • Planning how to achieve
  • Create opportunities to practise
  • Observe and give feedback
  • Support through the setbacks

David Clutterbuck commented, “Coaching can help manage performance by addressing individual’s weaknesses and potentials, making sure staff have the knowledge to fulfil their role and develop so that they can take on new projects and progress within the organisation.

“Most organisations are now using their line managers to develop staff through coaching. This can have huge benefits, making employees feel their line managers and the organisation as a whole care about their development and job satisfaction. However, if coaching is to deliver on its promise, employers need to ensure that line managers are provided with sufficient training themselves.”

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