Lack of Training Means Lack of Talent

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Organisations are failing to offer sufficient career development and training opportunities to managers, which is leading to increased recruitment and retention problems.

Research conducted by the Chartered Management Institute shows that although 74% of individuals believe management qualifications are becoming more important, over half of organisations admit they offer little in the way of career development or training.

Further findings show that 81% of employers are experiencing recruitment problems, a fourfold increase since 2002, and 78% believe retention has become increasingly difficult.

Jo Causon, director of marketing and corporate affairs at the Chartered Management Institute, said that feedback from individual managers provides the clearest indication that pay is not their major motivator.

"[Managers] want employers to show commitment in the shape of ongoing professional development and, if organisations are serious about retaining the best talent, they urgently need to meet these needs. Failure to do so will, in the short-term, ensure the top talent leaves. In the long-term it will mean that a solution to the skills crisis will be no nearer reality than it is today."

The findings come after a TUC report, Time to tackle the training divide, as reported on TrainingZone, which found that over a third of UK employers (35%) fail to offer their staff any training at work.

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